© Fairyland x Boxmaker Inc.

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© Fairyland x Boxmaker Inc.

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Winter Solstice

Longest night
The winter solstice, also known as Midwinter, is the shortest day and longest night of the year. In the Northern Hemisphere, it takes place between December 20 and 23, depending on the year. In the Southern Hemisphere, it happens in June.
 

Let there be light
Fire, sun and light are traditional symbols of celebrations held on the darkest day of the year.
 

It’s official
The winter solstice is the day of the year with the fewest hours of daylight, and it marks the start of astronomical winter, the “official” beginning of the season..
 

An ancient celebration
Winter solstice has been observed by humans for a very long time, perhaps as early as the Neolithic period. That began around 10,000 BC!
 

Light > dark
Many indigenous people use this time to call back the sun, and celebrate light's triumph over darkness through songs, dances, and the feeding and caring of each other during the darkest night of the year.

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© Fairland x Boxmaker Inc.

Winter Solstice

Longest night
The winter solstice, also known as Midwinter, is the shortest day and longest night of the year. In the Northern Hemisphere, it takes place between December 20 and 23, depending on the year. In the Southern Hemisphere, it happens in June.
 

Let there be light
Fire, sun and light are traditional symbols of celebrations held on the darkest day of the year.
 

It’s official
The winter solstice is the day of the year with the fewest hours of daylight, and it marks the start of astronomical winter, the “official” beginning of the season..
 

An ancient celebration
Winter solstice has been observed by humans for a very long time, perhaps as early as the Neolithic period. That began around 10,000 BC!
 

Light > dark
Many indigenous people use this time to call back the sun, and celebrate light's triumph over darkness through songs, dances, and the feeding and caring of each other during the darkest night of the year.

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