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Sadeh

But who’s counting? 


Sadeh is an ancient Iranian celebration which happens each year in late January. It marks the 100 days and nights until the first day of spring. “Sadeh” literally means “hundred” in Persian.

 

Happy accident

This mid-winter feast honors fire. Legend has it that the second King (Hushang) accidentally discovered fire when he threw his flint axe at a snake. It missed the snake but hit a stone and a spark was created. He then rubbed two pieces of flint together to create the first flame. Excited by the discovery, he hosted a grand feast around a large bonfire. That celebration, which dates back to the Achaemenid Empire, became Sadeh. 

 

All night long


In ancient celebrations a great fire was lit, which often required people to prepare for days preceding the festival by collecting firewood. On the celebration itself, the fire would be lit and maintained through the night. This festival honors the power of fire to overcome the forces of darkness, frost, and cold. 

 

Enough for everyone

Members of the community would take a piece of the great fire and bring it back to their own hearths to bless their households. A piece would also be brought to the temple to be kept throughout the year as “The Eternal Flame,” a symbol for the love of the homeland.

Warmth, light, and food

The modern-day celebration of Sadeh is a religious one observed by Zoroastrians. It still includes lighting a large fire, which people dance around. They also say prayers, play and listen to music, and indulge in a feast of traditional foods. 

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© Fairland x Boxmaker Inc.

Sadeh

But who’s counting? 


Sadeh is an ancient Iranian celebration which happens each year in late January. It marks the 100 days and nights until the first day of spring. “Sadeh” literally means “hundred” in Persian.

 

Happy accident

This mid-winter feast honors fire. Legend has it that the second King (Hushang) accidentally discovered fire when he threw his flint axe at a snake. It missed the snake but hit a stone and a spark was created. He then rubbed two pieces of flint together to create the first flame. Excited by the discovery, he hosted a grand feast around a large bonfire. That celebration, which dates back to the Achaemenid Empire, became Sadeh. 

 

All night long


In ancient celebrations a great fire was lit, which often required people to prepare for days preceding the festival by collecting firewood. On the celebration itself, the fire would be lit and maintained through the night. This festival honors the power of fire to overcome the forces of darkness, frost, and cold. 

Enough for everyone

Members of the community would take a piece of the great fire and bring it back to their own hearths to bless their households. A piece would also be brought to the temple to be kept throughout the year as “The Eternal Flame,” a symbol for the love of the homeland.

 

 

Warmth, light, and food

The modern-day celebration of Sadeh is a religious one observed by Zoroastrians. It still includes lighting a large fire, which people dance around. They also say prayers, play and listen to music, and indulge in a feast of traditional foods. 

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